6 Dimensions of Wellness + What Does Wellness Mean to You?

BY Chanel Hays · October 24, 2017

woman against pink wall

In conjunction with the rise of the organic food industry and proliferation of yoga studios, the trend of wellness is front and center, bringing a healthy lifestyle to the masses. However, adapting a lifestyle of wellness for yourself has become overwhelming to understand, among all the available information.

The 6 Dimensions of Wellness

Chrissy Weir, owner of Food Made Fresh and Holistic Health Coach, breaks it down for us with tips for understanding and applying wellness within six different dimensions: physical, emotional, social, intellectual, financial and spiritual. In each of these areas, the key is self-awareness and personalization. We aren’t one size fits all, and neither is our wellness, so read on to learn how to create your unique guide.

1. Physical Wellness

Physical wellness is up first because it impacts every other area. Here’s what you’re aiming for, according to Weir: stable energy, mental clarity, good digestion, confidence in your own skin and joy that brims over into the lives around you. The core tenant of physical wellness is using food as medicine. When you eat food that fuels your body and provides a variety of bio-available nutrients, you will start to feel these changes occur.

Weir gives us some basics: “Have a good dose of healthy fats, skip the processed sugars and instead go for natural options or whole fruit, enjoy grass-fed proteins, load your plate up with organic veggies and leafy greens and eat food in its whole, unprocessed form as much as possible.” The next tip is to “avoid chemicals and ingredients you can’t pronounce in food, supplements and products you put on your body to keep the toxic load on your liver at bay and detox pathways open, so your body can thrive,” says Weir.

Related Reading: The Best and Worst Foods for Your Skin

2. Emotional Wellness

In contrast to physical wellness, emotional wellness is impacted by the other dimensions. This means that if you feed the other dimensions of health in positive ways, you may experience overflow into your perspective of feeling. Weir illustrates it best as “having a heightened awareness and connectedness to your emotions, as you encounter experiences and process the world around you.” She encourages prayer, meditation and creating space for yourself to process through emotional experiences. However, it’s important to gain a level of emotional intelligence as you become more tuned in, “living a life where feelings don’t dictate your responses from one instance to the next.”

Related Reading: What Is Mindfulness?

3. Social Wellness 

Trendy acronyms such as FOMO, JOMO and YOLO don’t spell out the best way to achieve social balance. In a world that is more social than ever, you might think cutting back is the best way to feel better. In one sense, it is.

Do you have any surface-level friendships that suck time and energy and keep you from progress and purpose? Weir says let them go, but she follows with, “Instead, seek the type that push you further, keep you accountable and remain strong when the hustle of life keeps you from your weekly coffee dates.” And, then we hear the sappy truth, Weir imparts, “Share meaningful conversation and let friends into the vulnerable places. Go on spontaneous adventures and gather loved ones around the dinner table, often.” Snaps to that.

Related Reading: How to Live the Life That You Love

4. Intellectual Wellness 

You don’t have to be “book smart” to be intellectually well. Weir describes intellectual wellness as “a constant curiosity and desire to learn, followed by sharing your experiences, insight and knowledge with others.”

To do this, never stop learning! Surround yourself with good books, mentors and other resources (she loves podcasts). The digital age has brought us many options for career or passion-project education, which leads us to the application of intellectual wellness…

Related Reading: The Importance of Mentorship

5. Occupational Wellness

The feeling of occupational wellness, as Weir defines it, is “actually loving what you do, and becoming a more dynamic individual because of it—creating value, legacy and purpose for others to follow and step into.” But don’t misunderstand this. Weir has never liked the quote “If you do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life,” because even when you are doing what you love, there will always be some aspects that you don’t. But take heart with the knowledge that, “when you choose to step out, take risks and do something that aligns with your purpose and beliefs, even the most mundane aspects will have purpose and meaning,” Weir says.

Related Reading: 9 CEOs Share What They Do Each Day Before Noon

6. Spiritual Wellness 

Spirituality is spearheading the wellness charge. The yogis aren’t wrong, but there is a danger in being spiritually vague. According to Weir, spiritual wellness is being deeply connected to your purpose and understanding your irreplaceable role in the world. Get specific with what spirituality means to you.

“Our minds are too beautiful, our hearts too vast, complex and filled with love and the world around us a creation too glorious for there not to be a loving God who walks with us through every season,” Weir urges. She follows, “We are spiritual beings, so seek spirituality and what that means for your life, via prayer and meditation. Be intentional about quiet time throughout the day, so you can recalibrate your thoughts and reestablish actions based on your unique purpose. It’s a continual journey, so have grace for yourself along the way.”

Related Reading: 4 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Happy

Chanel Hays

Chanel Hays left a six-figure corporate job to start her own media and marketing company for small businesses. She's passionate about health and wellness and believes you should look as good as you feel and feel as goo... Read More >

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